Kanye West – No More Parties In L.A ft Kendrick Lamar [Single Review]

Kanye West - No More Parties In L.A

 

If there can only be one man in music with the ability to instantly perform a musical u-turn then that man can only be Kanye West. A follow up to the more sombre “Real Friends”, “No More Parties In L.A” is completely different, both musically and lyrically. This song perfectly encapsulates Kanye’s unpredictability. After his last album “Yeezus” which was more experimental than anything he’d ever done before, a traditional sample driven song such as the one we now find ourselves preoccupied with almost seems like a step backward.

The song samples significantly from ‘Suzie Thundertussy’ by Walter “Junie” Morrison. And whilst this Madlib produced song manages to retain some of the vibe from the sampled composition, Kanye West and Kendrick Lamar’s efforts manage to create a unique atmosphere primarily driven by both energetic and witty verses.The two did away with the more traditional three verse structure or what some like to call the “pop format”. Instead they opted for two very long verses. Kanye West opening Kendrick Lamar’s verse with a couple of lines is reminiscent of the back to back rap verses from times past. But this is only momentary and Kendrick Lamar is quick to take over and perform the rest of his breath taking verse.

The unmistakable swing on the drums gives the entire arrangement a very old school feel. The way in which the kick and snare are slightly syncopated is very reminiscent of a J Dilla production. The irony of this is that the late great J Dilla was a frequent collaborator of Madlib’s, and they were both known for their very distinctive styles of production which relied on heavily swung drums. And almost as if to drive home the fact that this is indeed a signature Madlib production, there is a more than prominent vocal sample repeating in the background. The bass line is very present, and apart from glueing the song together, it’s also one of the driving factors. The drums are very subdued in comparison to aforementioned elements.

Kanye seems to focus his lyrical efforts on painting an image of transition.  The lyric “Thinking back to how I got here in the first place. Second class bxxches wouldn’t let me on first base” is very poignant, and could easily be construed as attempting to pander to the male ego. But look beneath the surface and it’s clear that this is undoubtably a reference to his great success and the disparity between his past, and his present. Or perhaps it really is just another attempt by Mr. West at reminding us of how he made it. However, whilst not often credited for his technical ability as a rapper, one cannot deny that Kanye has a way with words . Nowhere is this more evident than in the lyric “When did I become A list? I wasn’t even on a list”. That is further elaborating on the contrast between his going from being a fairly average Joe to being incredibly successful.

 

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